About Joanna Shoffner Scott

Joanna Shoffner Scott is an experienced management consultant with expertise in racial equity. She is the founder and principal of Stamey Street Consulting Group, LLC, and is a Senior Consultant with the Race Matters Institute of JustPartners, Inc. Joanna consults with organizations across the country to advance racial equity as a mission-critical goal. Joanna’s work with clients include nonprofits, government units, community collaboratives, philanthropies and schools.

She is an experienced policy analyst with more than 15 years of experience in research, advocacy, government relations and management. Areas of policy focus include budget and tax policy, health, nutrition and family economic security. Joanna’s expertise lies in the intersection of race and equity in public policy and in public systems. Throughout the course of her career, she has held management positions with increasing responsibility in both Black-led and White-led organizations.

At heart, Joanna is a child advocate. Prior to launching a consulting career, Joanna was the Vice President of Government Affairs and Equity Programs at Voices for America’s Children. She is passionate about children’s issues and is interested in the ways race show up in educational settings, particularly for young children. In 2014, she launched a parenting blog called Mocha Parents, Awesome Kids as a forum to unpack issues of race experienced by parents.

Joanna holds a Ph.D. in public policy from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Need a conference speaker?

For organizations not already doing intentional race equity work, conferences are a way to offer a powerful introduction. In my experience, it can take an organization up to three (sometimes more) introductory experiences with a facilitator and an approach before they are ready to commit. While conference sessions are insufficient for doing a deep dive on race or race equity, they can provide staff with the space to explore the concepts and ask good questions.

Each person within an organization has the power to “call the question” when they witness or experience an action or practice that is racially inequitable. The question I ask my clients is whether their workplace environment is one that supports the exercise of that power.

Calling the Question
Joanna Shoffner Scott, PhD.